Support HB 4643: Direct Access For Physical Therapists in Illinois

To all of my friends and family read below.

HB 4643 has passed out of committee and will go to the House! This is the closest IL has every been to Direct Access for Physical Therapy Services. Please call the IL reps, even if you aren’t in Illinois. The more states that have direct access, the larger chance the states that do not will move toward it.

The Illinois Chiropractic Society has stated they are against PTs having direct access, mainly since this would put us on a fair playing field. We can pretty much guarantee every Chiro in Illinois will be on the phone to their reps, so lets do the same. All the info you should need is below.

We received great news today as our DIRECT ACCESS BILL PASSED OUT OF COMMITTEE. Now our DIRECT ACCESS bill heads to the House floor and we need your help NOW!
Below is a template letter that we would like you to forward to your House Representative in support of House Bill 4643. The full House will be voting on House Bill 4643 on Thursday or Friday.


Sample message:

I am writing to ask you to vote YES on HB 4643 as amended, which would provide direct access to physical therapists for Illinois residents. This is a practice which is already occurring in 44 states, several of which are not restricted in any way.
The amendments, in summary, provide that a physical therapist may provide services to a patient without a referral from a health care professional for 10 visits or 15 business days whichever occurs first. The bill also ensures that the physical therapist notifies the patient’s treating health care professional within 5 days, ensuring that all health care professionals in the continuum of care are informed of the patient’s treatment plan.
In addition, we have reached an agreement with the dentists and the chiropractors that addressed concerns relating to the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders and length of care.
This important legislation will provide better and faster access to physical therapy for all populations, including Medicare patients, and will help in the fight against opioid abuse in Illinois, as physical therapy is a non-prescription, non- addictive way to reduce pain.


We appreciate all stakeholders work on this bill as well as the work of legislative staff to bring HB 4643 without any objections from any stakeholders.
Please email, call and fax your legislator TODAY. You can find your Representative’s name and contact information, by entering your address at: https://www.illinoispolicy.org/maps/illinois-house/

It is important that every legislator hear our message from many constituents.
The legislation gives the public Direct Access to physical therapists in Illinois. You can access HB 4643, House Amendment 001, 002, 003 at www.ilga.gov. Click on “full text” to read amendment. A new definition labeled 1.2. Physical Therapy Services, allows direct access. There are a few protections for the public and they are reasonable.

10 Quick Tips for Staying Up To Date

Following some of the conversations that came out the #SocialPT talk I gave at CSM 2017 with Ben Fung, Greg Todd and Brett Kestenbaum(video via UpDoc Media), I felt it would be useful to create a resource to help students and clinicians stay up to date with the evidence. As an emerging researcher and academic, I am passionate about serving this profession as both a purveyor and guide of knowledge to help inform the care provided in our communities. No more ivory towers and no more “knowledge obscura”. We are all our profession’s keeper and the better informed we all are individually, the better off our profession will be collectively. In the list below, I have provided 10 easy tips to help clinicians and students stay current through a variety of different methods, many of which only require a small addition to a typical day. 90% of them are completely free and 100% are of no additional cost for APTA members. Choose one or choose all 10!

1) Use the APTA PTNow website ($)

PT Now is a resource designed for APTA members which provides summary findings on clinical questions, access to clinical practice guidelines, validated outcome measures and an article search function. Also be sure to check out the APTA PT Outcomes Registry. This project will allow clinicians to participate in the research process by contributing outcomes data to a national registry. The data from this project will be instrumental in advancing care for our patients and creating leverage with legislators and policy makers.

2) Create a PubMed MyNCBI account and create saved searches (free)

This will allows users to track research topics, questions or relationships that interest them. Users can then schedule email reminders on these topics as new papers are published. Though these are only abstracts, it’s a good start and often once the PubMed link is obtained most people have an easier time finding the manuscript. There are also many articles available through PubMed Central, a database designed to host biomedical information free to the public. I have included a YouTube video of how to set up a MyNCBI account and saved searches as well as a step by step instruction with pictures.

YouTube Demo

How to set up “saved searches”

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Step 1. Create a MyNCBI account

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Step 2. After creating a MyNCBI account, log in and perform a search on a topic that interests you; i.e. “Back Pain”

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Step 3. After the search is performed, click on “Create Alert”

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Step 4. Create a saved search with scheduled reminders delivered to your email at a frequency of your choosing.

3) Push notifications” from Journal Twitter accounts

This will push notifications to your phone whenever the Twitter account for a selected journal posts. Many  of these Twitter accounts also have public “lists” of journals, clinicians and researchers they follow which may help structure your search, as an examples the Cardiopulmonary Section’s Twitter Account has two (one cardiac and one pulmonary/critical care). I have included a step by step instruction with pictures for both.

How to “Push Notifications on Twitter”

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Step 1. Click/tap on the notifications icon

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Step 2. Select “All Tweets”

How to subscribe to a “list” on a Twitter account

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Step 1. Click/tap on the settings button.

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Step 2. Select view lists

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Step 3. Select a list you would like to subscribe to.

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Step 4. Click/tap “subscribe”

4) Subscribe YouTube channels and Podcasts (free)

These platforms provide synthesized content on research or clinical topics. The content on podcasts will generally be audio only and Youtube Channels will usually use both visual and audio. These resources are great since they can be listened to while doing something else, such as the ride to and from work or while exercising. Podcasts are particularly great because if users have the podcast app for iTunes, updates to podcasts they subscribe to are automatically pushed to their phone. I have compiled a good list of YouTube Channels and Podcasts for physical therapists here but be sure to perform your own search to find channels or podcasts that interest you. A few of the YouTube channels I subscribe to are the New England Journal of Medicine, British Journal of Sports Medicine and Heart by the British Medical Journal. Also don’t forget to check out the Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal Podcast!

5) Register/Subscribe to a journal email list (free)

This allows users to receive an updates on new publications and papers published ahead of print. I have provided a step by step example for how to do it through the New England Journal of Medicine, a journal that also often publishes open access (free) manuscripts.

How to “Register/Subscribe to a journal email list”

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Step 1. Click “Register”

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Step 2. Fill in your email and select a password to register. A confirmation email will be sent to you.

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Step 3. Select the “content alerts” and specialty areas you would like to receive emails about. Some journals may not have multiple options.

6) Follow Facebook pages for journals (free)

This tip is similar to “pushing notifications” for twitter. However, an advantage of doing this through Facebook is that more people both have Facebook accounts and check them daily than Twitter. One of the easiest ways to keep up to date with the evidence is make it a component of your daily life.

How to “Push Notifications on For a Facebook Page”

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Step 1. Click on the “Following” button

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Step 2. Click/Tap the notifications tab, then under “Posts” select receive notifications from “All Posts”

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Step 3. Click/Tap the “News Feed” Tab and choose “see notifications from this page on your timeline first”. This places posts from this page at the top of your timeline (not necessary but useful for many)

7) Follow individual researchers (free)

Many researchers have social media accounts and a large portion of them are fairly active, especially on Twitter I actually made a list of some of these accounts worth checking out. Users can also, “push notifications” from their accounts too! I would also recommend signing up for researchgate, this site is increasingly being used by both researchers and clinicians alike. On this site many researchers provide full texts of their papers that can be downloaded, usually 1 year post publication. Users can also request papers from researchers that aren’t publicly available yet on researchgate.

8) Join in the discussions on twitter (free)

To join in these discussions follow hashtags such as #solvePT or #BackPain. To be more specific, I would also recommend using Symplur , a free healthcare hashtag aggregator to help find topics that interest you and even monthly twitter journal clubs such as BMJ Heart’s “Heart Journal Club” #HeartJC .

9) Join in discussions on Facebook groups (free)

One of the best ways to stay informed is to regularly participate in professional discourse. This allows clinicians to appreciate different perspectives from colleagues and to have their biases potentially challenged. Even if you don’t participate, observing some of the discussions from a distance can be useful too! Doctor of Physical Therapy Students or Physical Therapy Practice Education and Networking are two of the largest and most active groups. These groups are also great for asking questions and sharing information.

10) Create a system to manage your citations (free)

As you begin to accumulate resources, especially published work it is important to keep track of them in an organized fashion. This allows you to quickly reference papers and to search for them later. I use Mendeley and Google Drive; both are free to use and excellent software solutions! Mendeley also offers a google chrome extension that allows me to cite resources as I browse. Google Drive has a desktop app that allows me to save files locally on my hard-drive while also continuously and simultaneously pushing files to a cloud based folder which can be accessed anywhere with internet access; even on my phone with the Google Drive App.


I hope these quick tips will provide a better infrastructure for both finding research papers and regularly consuming evidence. If we are all individually more up to date with the scientific literature, better informed decisions can be made for the people and communities we serve!

Introduction

This summer I am working on developing brief videos (5-6min) which will offer summaries on current evidence regarding topics related to rehabilitation as well as reviews on new publications as they come out. The working title is “Rehab Reviews”. The goal will be to cover the full spectrum of rehabilitation. Therefore, I will also be reaching out to experts for reviews on topics that escape my area of expertise.

Many clinicians have both limited access to journals and time to read them. I feel this platform will improve access to evidence while also making it more consumable. Please feel free to share with your colleagues and to comment or message me with topics you would like to have discussed.

These videos will remain publicly accessible through our YouTube Channel  “PTReviewer” and free of cost. Each video post will also include an outline, a link to the pubmed search link and references for those who wish to read further. More details will be coming in the next few weeks. This should be a lot of fun! Together let’s ‪#‎solvePT‬!!!